Cosmetics 101 – Giving Your Teeth the Charcoal Treatment

I first heard about using charcoal in cosmetic products some years ago, but was only familiar with it being used in soap as a great cleanser for the face. Since then it seems to have sprung onto the mainstream beauty market in leaps and bounds, precisely as a facial cleanser, having been picked up by the larger companies as the new wonder product.

Personally I have used charcoal quite a lot through my life, but mainly for sketching with, artists-charcoal-sticks_352x352and in a more solid format as heat-blocks used in firing and soldering precious metals in making jewellery. The latest craze however, face-masks aside, is what is known as Activated Charcoal used as a tooth-polish. A little bit of research revealed it to be an exceptionally effective product for cleaning and whitening teeth when used regularly. So I thought I would give it a try.

Apparently, activated charcoal in particular helps absorb a variety of toxic substances, including grease, dirt, and plaque. It is used in hospitals for treating instances of poisoning by mixing a small amount with water and drinking. It will soon get to work absorbing all the toxins to be flushed safely from the body through normal functional means, and thus helping the patient resume normal life expectancy.

I found a supplier through Amazon just before Christmas 2016 and purchased my Activated Charcoal, then began using it as part of my twice daily dental cleaning regime.

I dispensed a small amount of the extremely fine powder into a small easy to use cosmetic pot with a screw top lid, which I just refill as and when needed, that way I can avoid contaminating the mother lode. I just dip a slightly damp toothbrush into the charcoal and begin brushing away as normal. I will then follow up with regular toothpaste just to wash the charcoal off of my teeth, although you don’t have to, you can just give your mouth a good rinse, except I find this doesn’t really do the job too well.

Beware of spillages or excess spray while brushing when using the charcoal as it is incredibly messy and seems to adhere to the skin and most surfaces extremely well.

charcoal-powder

I have used the charcoal in a homemade face mask, and although very effective, be prepared to have scrubbing mitts and a good bar of soap at the ready as it can be difficult to remove entirely. Also be careful when you open the container that the charcoal is in, as it has a tendency to become airborne with only so much as a look…

After using it as a dental cleaner for the past two months I have found the Activated Charcoal to be extremely effective, in fact more so than toothpaste alone. Toothpaste just doesn’t remove plaque and food as effectively, nor does it whiten your teeth as well. Furthermore the charcoal powder isn’t as abrasive or as caustic as bicarbonate of soda, or other so-called ‘wonder’ substances for cleaning and whitening teeth. It is flavourless, inert, and gentle on the gums. Brilliant stuff really, and I’m usually pretty dubious about such things especially when given a lot of hype.

Try it for yourself. You’ll not be disappointed, and do it before somebody decides to charge excessive amounts of money for it. You may just save yourself a trip or two to the dentist and a whole bunch of money to boot!

Activated Charcoal isn’t expensive, currently, and a little goes a long way. I purchased a 16oz pot for no more than $16 U.S., which I think might just last me the rest of my life. Smaller quantities are also available.

Thanks for reading, and enjoy your alchemical adventures!

 

M.

P.S. Let me know how you get on too, if you do decide to give this a go. 🙂

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One comment on “Cosmetics 101 – Giving Your Teeth the Charcoal Treatment

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